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Logic. Book I. Analysis of Thought. Chapter I. Common Ground. 

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Manuscript Metadata

Resource ID

23295

Access

Open

Contributed by

Frederik Wellmann

type of material

A. MS.

description

Definition of "logic," and the pitfalls encountered on the way to a definition. Derivation of the term "science." For CSP, science refers to the collective and cooperative undertakings of men who have devoted themselves to inquiries of a general kind. Logic depends neither upon any special science nor upon metaphysics. Logic presupposes a number of truths derivable from ordinary experience or observation. These truths, handed down from the prescientific age as common sense, are not the truths of any special science or of science in general. Remarks on classification of the sciences.

general index

Classification of the sciences, Common ground, Common sense (see also Critical commonsensism), Logic (modal see Modality), Observation, Science, classification of Science, definition of Science, Thought

pagination

pp. 1-29, with 8 pp. of variants

Date

1908-11-28/1908-12-01

number

MS0615_034

abbreviated title

(Logic I.i)

date (Robin)

1908-11-28/1908-12-01

go to Manuscript Pages

 Public : MS_0615
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